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Shoot for the stars

  • Point out some of the things you can see in the night sky. It could be stars, the moon or planets, (you could use an app to help you find them).

  • Point out and name at least one constellation you can see.

  • Draw or make a model of one of the eight planets in our solar system. You could use papier-mache to make your model.

  • Find out about a space mission, an astronaut or a planet in our solar system.

  • Make a model of the solar system.

  • Explain the difference between a planet and a star.

  • Observe the moon, using binoculars or a telescope.

  • Identify three constellations.

  • Find out about two space-related subjects and present some information about them. You could find out about planets, the history of space exploration or space technology.

  • Find out how craters are formed, and what meteorites tell us about the universe. You could experiment using marbles, rubber balls or stones as meteorites, and a tray filled with sand as your planet/moon surface.

  • Build your own satellite dish. Find out about everyday items that rely on satellites.

  • Draw a picture about what life elsewhere in the universe might look like.

  • Write a comic strip about how humanity would react to the discovery of life elsewhere in the universe.

  • Find out about the International Space Station and how astronauts live and work on board.

  • Research a current space mission, such as a mission to Mars.

  • Design and build a model of your own space probe or other spacecraft, including the instruments on board that enable it to complete its mission

  • Build, launch and recover a model rocket.

  • Learn the meaning of the terms celestial, equator, poles, circumpolar and zodiac.

  • Build a model, with scaled distances between the planets, of the solar system using everyday materials found in the home, such as different size fruit or sports balls.

  • Explain how the Moon affects the tides.

  • Observe three constellations on a clear night and record what you saw.

  • Learn how to identify a satellite. How do you tell it apart from an aeroplane, star, planet or a meteor?

  • Identify a satellite to observe on a clear night (visit www.james.darpinian.com/satellites to see when a satellite will pass above you.